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27 Mar 2008

War on Terror in the V&A, London

Gallery snapshot. View gallery of War on Terror in the V&A, London

We've done it again! Another prestigious Museum has accepted our board game into their collection. Last month, the Imperial War Museum welcomed WoT into their esteemed array of historical objects and now we're very happy and humbled to report that the Victoria & Albert Museum has also recognised the cultural value of War on Terror.

The V&A is considered (by themselves) the greatest museum of art and design. It holds over 3000 years worth of artifacts from many cultures. The scope of the entire collection is simply jaw-dropping and also bang up to date, so if you haven't been before we certainly recommend it. Once more we are pleasantly surprised that world experts deem our board game worthy of recognition, while the commercial sector continue to ban us in the name of public wellbeing.

What is more surprising on this occasion is that our game has been accepted into the Museum of Childhood branch of the V&A. This was their decision, not ours. We are absolutely stoked. Maybe this game isn't as mind-warpingly dangerous as we are lead to believe?

In light of these recent educational endorsements it seems apt to take this opportunity to thank some other educational types who have been in touch with us. The following men of good standing have understood our less-than-evil intentions and spoken up in our defense. We doff our EVIL balaclavas to you, gentlemen:

'A cleverly crafted satire that can be used by educators to provoke students to think critically about one of the most important issues of our time'
- Dr. Nick Megoran, lecturer in Geopolitics and Human Geography, University of Newcastle

'Genius is said not to stray far from madness but I'm sure you guys are on the side of the former'
- Dr. Duncan Salkeld, senior lecturer in English, University of Chichester

'War on Terror presents students with geographies they know they know. It also presents unknown geographies that they know about; that is to say they know there are some geographies they do not know. But War on Terror also presents geographical unknown unknowns - the ones that they don't know about yet but will begin to question before the end of the game. War on Terror makes a terrible starter for a lesson but an outstanding starter for an education.'
-Daniel Raven-Ellison, Head of Geography, Langtree School, Reading

Posted by TerrorBull Games on 27 March 2008 - 1 comment

Comments so far:

  1. an alliance treaty pad. with printed peace treaty agreement for parties to sign. terrorist uprising punishment for breaking rules. had a fun night where one got set on fire.ben tucker from london - 26 April 2008

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